Seven yellow canaries must be good luck

DSCN0868.JPG

We see them all the time but they usually don’t sit still for long.

DSCN0891.JPG

Bright yellow plumage with a bandit mask and a sinister expression.

DSCN0881.JPG

A squawking myna bird crashes the party.

Advertisements

Not-so-secret Hamama Falls

DSCN1710.JPG

Lots of people make the ostensibly forbidden hike up a steady incline into Waiheʻe Valley in Kahaluʻu to see beautiful Hamama Falls.

DSCN1604.JPG

Lots of nice wild orchids along the way.

dscn1562

At least it says “Aloha.”  That’s what makes Hawaiʻi different.

DSCN1579.JPG

Nice, clear, cool water in the swimming hole below the old water supply spillway.

DSCN1590.JPG

Wild Butterfly Pea flowers.

DSCN1620.JPG

DSCN1690.JPG

Up, up, up until you’re there.

DSCN1675.JPG

No place to swim, but it’s great to look at.

DSCN1665.JPG

DSCN1581.JPG

Waiheʻe Stream is usually pretty mellow.

DSCN1742.JPG

DSCN1657.JPG

Stoner’s paradise?

DSCN1753.JPG

Not so pretty.  Why do people always toss their junk near trailheads?  At least somebody saved the cylinder head for something.

DSCN1763.JPG

Raggedy Tree Marigold with a bumblebee visitor.

DSCN1671.JPG

One more for the road!  Beautiful.

The strange and amazing Cannonball Tree

DSCN1541.JPG

Native mostly to parts of Central America and South America, the weird Cannonball Tree is cultivated in a few other places and a couple specimens can be found on Oahu.

DSCN1555.JPG

Although the fruit looks a bit like a husked coconut, the tree itself bears no resemblance.

DSCN1547.JPG

It starts with a bud that becomes a pretty blossom …

DSCN1551.JPG

… and eventually becomes a “cannonball.”

DSCN1552.JPG

The fruit can be fed to chickens and pigs, and is said to have medicinal qualities for both humans and animals.

 

 

Bay Area interlude: Part I

DSCN5115.JPG

DSCN5092

An early morning at the Sutro Baths ruins near the Cliff House at the north end of Ocean Beach, San Francisco.  The Sutro Baths opened in 1896 as the world’s largest indoor pool.  The structure burned down in 1966 and the area has been a nice place to wander ever since.

DSCN5116.JPG

DSCN5132.JPG

The ruins are now part of the Golden Gate National Recreation Area, which includes some good walking paths and trails, even a couple tunnels.

DSCN5140.JPG

Parts of the ruins now function as artificial tidepools.

DSCN5247.JPG

The Seal Rocks, just off the beach, are mostly full of pelicans these days.

DSCN5189

A guano miner’s dream.

DSCN5173.JPG

Just don’t splat us, please.

DSCN5305.JPG

There’s a nice beach at low tide, but it’s not there for long.

DSCN5238.JPG

A gathering spot for early morning fishermen.

DSCN5087

There are also lots of big black ravens.  They remind me of the Maltese Falcon, a San Francisco icon (and cliche).

DSCN5112.JPG

The sandstone cliffs are really cool.

DSCN5236.JPG

DSCN5233.JPG

So are the bluffs above.

DSCN5341.JPG

Somebody’s lost feather got stuck in a California Poppy, making it look almost like a Hawaiian Hibiscus.

DSCN5336.JPG

DSCN5332.JPG

The north tower of the Golden Gate Bridge is barely visible through the morning fog.

DSCN5276.JPG

Along with another squadron of pelicans.

DSCN5273.JPG

We’ll head over that way too.

 

Beautiful Hawaiian Monarch Butterflies

Monarch 1.JPG

I photographed these lovely Hawaiian Monarch butterflies and poinsettias right around Christmas time last year.  I think they make a beautiful combination.

Monarch 3

Monarchs are not endemic to Hawaii, but are thought to have arrived from California.  The Monarch is a very migratory species.