Beware the deadly Dragon’s Breath

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It’s always nice to the see the blow holes below the Makapuu Lighthouse Trail when they’re really pumping out spray.  Some people call it Dragon’s Breath, and refer to the side by side blow holes as the Dragon’s Nostrils.

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It’s been a few years since I’ve hiked down the hill to dip in the beautiful tide pools and see the Dragon’s Breath up close.  It’s not a hard hike, but the area can be deadly dangerous when the waves are acting wild.  This was not the day.

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Humuhumunukunukuapua’a school

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Ran into a whole school of Humus near the War Memorial Natatorium in Waikiki.

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They’re our official State Fish and they’re pretty common, but you don’t always see a whole school right by the shoreline.

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It was a little breezy so the water was choppy, but at least it was nice and clear.

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The Natatorium has been slowly crumbling for decades.  The famous arch is still in pretty good shape though.

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“The Life of the Land is Perpetuated in Righteousness.”

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But the old Natatorium keeps crumbling away.

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Buddha gives us a hand in the garden

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The unusual “Buddha’s Hand” tree is an interesting sight in Foster Botanical Garden, a tranquil oasis in bustling downtown Honolulu.

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It belongs to the citrus family, and is originally from India.

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This fruit looks more like Buddha’s claw.

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And this one has lots of extra fingers.

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There’s a nice Buddha statue nearby too.  A visit to the garden is an enlightening way to spend the day.

Hanauma Bay Ridge and the uncrossed Bridge of Doom

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Hanauma Bay Ridge is an, ahem, “unsanctioned” trail far above the tourist hordes that converge on the shoreline of the bay.

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Some great views of the bay and Koko Crater beyond.

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Lots of dry scrub inside the crater that sits high above the bay and is far less eroded.

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The pheasants inside are pretty elusive, more likely to be heard than seen.

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Some treacherous sea cliffs rise above the ocean.

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And a lava shelf leads to the Bridge of Doom.

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It’s more commonly known as the “Rock Bridge” or “Stone Bridge.”

I call it the Bridge of Doom because of the tragic accidents that have occurred there.

People like to stand on the bridge and have their picture taken.  Most of the time, it just looks cheesy.  Sometimes, it looks downright foolish.

And every once in a while, a wave crashes over the bridge and puts and end to the fun and games.

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We’ll leave this bridge uncrossed.

 

Ka Iwi Coast sea caves and petroglyphs

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Caves and lava tubes are tucked away among the intricately eroded sea cliffs.

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And some hide semi-secret historical treasures …

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… that tell stories of long ago.

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Many have eroded badly over the centuries.

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Tide pools form in eroded lava shelves.

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And tunnels lead to favorite fishing spots.

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Hidden away from the city’s noise and traffic.

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Aloha.